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brianmichaelbendis:

College student Flash Thompson can go to hell.

Amazing Spider-Man #31 by Stan Lee & Steve Ditko.

Source: alexhchung
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brianmichaelbendis:

Gwen Stacy (Ultimate Spider-Man #14, 2001)

  • Art by Mark Bagley & Art Thibert
Source: thebendisageofcomics
Photo Set

brianmichaelbendis:

Marvel Heroes Montages by John Byrne

I will admit I have in the past implied that Byrne may have a limited range of faces. withdrawn. 

Source: marvel1980s
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johndarnielle:

kateordie:

pocketaimee:

Hell-aciously busy with work, but I really wanted to draw this comic.

I love comics like this.

Hulk was my favorite, too.

Thank you, whoever you are, for this. 

(via mattfractionblog)

Source: pocketaimee
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brianmichaelbendis:

Hipster Kitty Pryde by Nate Bellegarde

Source: professorxisajerk
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archiemcphee:

Bryan Berg is a professional card stacker and currently holds the Guinness records for the Tallest House of Freestanding Playing Cards and The World’s Largest House of Freestanding Playing Cards.

Introduced to the art of card stacking by his grandfather when he was 8 years old, Bryan has spent the last 30 years perfecting his craft and repeatedly breaking his own awesome records. His card structures a built with standard decks of playing cards and do not rely on any folding, tape, glue or other trickery in order to hold together.

"I have many techniques that I use to build my structures from standard commercially available decks of cards," he explained. "I’m never just randomly placing cards, I’m always following a set technique for a certain visual or structural goal. All of the cards are placed at right angles in such a way as to brace each other from falling over or bending under a load."

"Most of the time my structures do not collapse, says Bryan. "Because of the structural geometry and all the weight of the cards, they are very strong and stable."

Visit Bryan Berg’s website to check out many more of his amazing playing card structures.

[via Telegraph.co.uk and Inspirationfeed]

It’s Using Tiny Things to Make Big Things Day on Geyser of Awesome!

(via ruckawriter)

Source: archiemcphee
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70sscifiart:

Vintage-style posters of sci-fi classics.

Via Geek Art.

Source: 70sscifiart
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Gulnara Karimova: How do you solve a problem like Googosha?

ruckawriter:

A year ago, the daughter of the Uzbek president was riding high - a businesswoman, a pop star with a catchy name, she was even seen as a possible future leader. But over the past 12 months all that’s changed - her businesses closed, her official positions snatched away. Can she bounce back?

Story by Natalia Antelava for the BBC.

I am fascinated by Karimova. She is a Bond villain, I swear to God.

I thought I was pretty jaded, but people like this don’t exist, right? All the major figures, not just Gulnara. right?

Source: ruckawriter
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Link

The U.S. Army is Testing Auto-Aiming Rifles

ruckawriter:

TrackingPoint’s .338 Lapua Magnum XS1, photo by TrackingPoint.

Consider it performance enhancement for snipers. Guns made by a company called TrackingPoint, which include a special computer and targeting system built into the gun itself, turn inexperienced marksmen into expert shots on the first try, and could make already-trained snipers and sharpshooters even better. Now, the technology is no longer just a novelty for wealthy hunters; at SHOT Show (a major gun exposition), a marketing official from TrackingPoint revealed that the United States Army bought “several” of the rifles, and is rumored to be evaluating them for military use.

TrackingPoint rifles are expensive, running up to $27,000 apiece. For comparison, the M4 carbine, currently a standard rifle used by the United States military, runs about $700 apiece. The M70, a sniper rifle used by the U.S. Marine Corps since the 1960s, cost about $6,500 in 2006. But the point of the gun isn’t for cost savings (though there may be some in reduced time to train snipers, if it becomes adopted); the point of the gun it to make the first shot count.

Not scary at all. Nope.

Source: ruckawriter